"Grounds We Share", 2019 by Michael Lee

Installation view (from Middle Road) of "Grounds We Share" at The Plaza, National Library Building, Singapore, a community arts project of Silver Arts 2019, led by artist Michael Lee with 16 participants. Photo by Ng Hui Hsien.

Installation view (from Middle Road) of "Grounds We Share" at The Plaza, National Library Building, Singapore, a community arts project of Silver Arts 2019, led by artist Michael Lee with 16 participants. Photo by Ng Hui Hsien.

Details:

15 miniatures of community spaces by 16 seniors, led by Michael Lee

Led by artist Michael Lee, Grounds We Share is a community arts project where seniors reimagine community spaces. Over eight workshops, the artist engaged a group of seniors in papercrafting activities and discussions about the potentials and pitfalls of community spaces. In an excursion to the URA Centre, the seniors viewed various architectural models to understand how Singapore plans and redevelops its urban spaces. These insights served as inspiration for the seniors to review, further discuss and refine their creations, which culminated in a final show-and-tell.

Related:

Brochure

Friendly Strangers Party, 2019 by Michael Lee

Michael Lee,  Friendly Strangers Party  (detail), 2019, laser jet print on paper, 100 pennant flags of dimensions 25 x 18 cm each, part of the group exhibition “ONLY CONNECT Osaka”, 2019, curated by Yutaka Inagawa at Creative Center Osaka. Photo by Kiyohito Mikami.

Michael Lee, Friendly Strangers Party (detail), 2019, laser jet print on paper, 100 pennant flags of dimensions 25 x 18 cm each, part of the group exhibition “ONLY CONNECT Osaka”, 2019, curated by Yutaka Inagawa at Creative Center Osaka. Photo by Kiyohito Mikami.

Details:

Friendly Strangers Party is a text-based installation that addresses hazy memory and fleeting encounters. It is an inventory of words or deeds of a select group of people whom the artist Michael Lee has met in his life. Almost always singular and brief, each meeting nonetheless lurks in the artist’s mind, though he is unable to confidently ascertain the strangers’ intentions or recall ever asking for their names. The work is realised as a collection of pennant flags bearing texts that refer to each encounter. Distilled into the present tense and appearing across both sides of a flag, each textual account reads like a campaign’s call to action. Together, the flags invite remixes and new readings of the interactions, and of a psychological party that is not ending anytime soon.

Michael Lee,  Friendly Strangers Party  (detail), 2019, laser jet print on paper, 100 pennant flags of dimensions 25 x 18 cm each, part of the group exhibition “ONLY CONNECT Osaka”, 2019, curated by Yutaka Inagawa at Creative Center Osaka. Photo by Kiyohito Mikami.

Michael Lee, Friendly Strangers Party (detail), 2019, laser jet print on paper, 100 pennant flags of dimensions 25 x 18 cm each, part of the group exhibition “ONLY CONNECT Osaka”, 2019, curated by Yutaka Inagawa at Creative Center Osaka. Photo by Kiyohito Mikami.

Michael Lee,  Friendly Strangers Party  (detail), 2019, laser jet print on paper, 100 pennant flags of dimensions 25 x 18 cm each, part of the group exhibition “ONLY CONNECT Osaka”, 2019, curated by Yutaka Inagawa at Creative Center Osaka. Photo by Kiyohito Mikami.

Michael Lee, Friendly Strangers Party (detail), 2019, laser jet print on paper, 100 pennant flags of dimensions 25 x 18 cm each, part of the group exhibition “ONLY CONNECT Osaka”, 2019, curated by Yutaka Inagawa at Creative Center Osaka. Photo by Kiyohito Mikami.

Michael Lee,  Friendly Strangers Party  (installation view), 2019, laser jet print on paper, 100 pennant flags of dimensions 25 x 18 cm each, part of the group exhibition “ONLY CONNECT Osaka”, 2019, curated by Yutaka Inagawa at Creative Center Osaka. Photo by Kiyohito Mikami.

Michael Lee, Friendly Strangers Party (installation view), 2019, laser jet print on paper, 100 pennant flags of dimensions 25 x 18 cm each, part of the group exhibition “ONLY CONNECT Osaka”, 2019, curated by Yutaka Inagawa at Creative Center Osaka. Photo by Kiyohito Mikami.

Museum on Air, 2018 by Michael Lee

Michael Lee,  Museum on Art  (view of reflection off entrance door), 2018, 320-degree LED ropes, vinyl stickers on LED lamps, matt enamel spraypaint on perspex sheets, steel tripods and cable ties, dimensions variable, part of the exhibition “Installation in Progress” curated by John Tung at Curve, Singapore Art Museum. Photo by Tan Hai Han.

Michael Lee, Museum on Art (view of reflection off entrance door), 2018, 320-degree LED ropes, vinyl stickers on LED lamps, matt enamel spraypaint on perspex sheets, steel tripods and cable ties, dimensions variable, part of the exhibition “Installation in Progress” curated by John Tung at Curve, Singapore Art Museum. Photo by Tan Hai Han.

Details:

Museum on Art is a 3-dimensional anamorphic diagram of a hypothetical art museum of the future. The cloud outlines suggest the importance of daydreaming possibilities despite limitations and constraints. Below the cloud are rains of icons referring to details of this imaginary museum: missions, functions, programmes, amenities and facilities.


Related:

Time-lapse setup video

Michael Lee,  Museum on Art  (view from museum porch corridor), 2018, 320-degree LED ropes, vinyl stickers on LED lamps, matt enamel spraypaint on perspex sheets, steel tripods and cable ties, dimensions variable, part of the exhibition “Installation in Progress” curated by John Tung at Curve, Singapore Art Museum. Photo by Tan Hai Han.

Michael Lee, Museum on Art (view from museum porch corridor), 2018, 320-degree LED ropes, vinyl stickers on LED lamps, matt enamel spraypaint on perspex sheets, steel tripods and cable ties, dimensions variable, part of the exhibition “Installation in Progress” curated by John Tung at Curve, Singapore Art Museum. Photo by Tan Hai Han.

Michael Lee,  Museum on Art  (view from Bras Basah Road), 2018, 320-degree LED ropes, vinyl stickers on LED lamps, matt enamel spraypaint on perspex sheets, steel tripods and cable ties, dimensions variable, part of the exhibition “Installation in Progress” curated by John Tung at Curve, Singapore Art Museum. Photo by Tan Hai Han.

Michael Lee, Museum on Art (view from Bras Basah Road), 2018, 320-degree LED ropes, vinyl stickers on LED lamps, matt enamel spraypaint on perspex sheets, steel tripods and cable ties, dimensions variable, part of the exhibition “Installation in Progress” curated by John Tung at Curve, Singapore Art Museum. Photo by Tan Hai Han.

Michael Lee,  Museum on Art  (view from Queen Street), 2018, 320-degree LED ropes, vinyl stickers on LED lamps, matt enamel spraypaint on perspex sheets, steel tripods and cable ties, dimensions variable, part of the exhibition “Installation in Progress” curated by John Tung at Curve, Singapore Art Museum. Photo by Tan Hai Han.

Michael Lee, Museum on Art (view from Queen Street), 2018, 320-degree LED ropes, vinyl stickers on LED lamps, matt enamel spraypaint on perspex sheets, steel tripods and cable ties, dimensions variable, part of the exhibition “Installation in Progress” curated by John Tung at Curve, Singapore Art Museum. Photo by Tan Hai Han.

Michael Lee,  Museum on Art  (oblique view), 2018, 320-degree LED ropes, vinyl stickers on LED lamps, matt enamel spraypaint on perspex sheets, steel tripods and cable ties, dimensions variable, part of the exhibition “Installation in Progress” curated by John Tung at Curve, Singapore Art Museum. Photo by Tan Hai Han.

Michael Lee, Museum on Art (oblique view), 2018, 320-degree LED ropes, vinyl stickers on LED lamps, matt enamel spraypaint on perspex sheets, steel tripods and cable ties, dimensions variable, part of the exhibition “Installation in Progress” curated by John Tung at Curve, Singapore Art Museum. Photo by Tan Hai Han.

Michael Lee,  Museum on Art , 2018, 320-degree LED ropes, vinyl stickers on LED lamps, matt enamel spraypaint on perspex sheets, steel tripods and cable ties, dimensions variable, part of the exhibition “Installation in Progress” curated by John Tung at Curve, Singapore Art Museum. Photo by Tan Hai Han.

Michael Lee, Museum on Art, 2018, 320-degree LED ropes, vinyl stickers on LED lamps, matt enamel spraypaint on perspex sheets, steel tripods and cable ties, dimensions variable, part of the exhibition “Installation in Progress” curated by John Tung at Curve, Singapore Art Museum. Photo by Tan Hai Han.


Where do stories begin / Where do stories end, 2019 by Michael Lee

Michael Lee and Perception3,  Where do stories begin / Where do stories end  (detail), 2019, LED neon rope mounted on acrylic sheets installed on railings of Cavenagh Bridge, Singapore, part of “Bridges of Time”: i Light 2019 Bicentennial Edition. Photo by Supergrapher.

Michael Lee and Perception3, Where do stories begin / Where do stories end (detail), 2019, LED neon rope mounted on acrylic sheets installed on railings of Cavenagh Bridge, Singapore, part of “Bridges of Time”: i Light 2019 Bicentennial Edition. Photo by Supergrapher.

Details:

Where do stories begin / Where do stories end is a two-part, text-based and site-specific installation that invites us to consider the notion of history as a series of layered stories that unfold and fold into one another perpetually. The two parts of the title prompt us to reflect on what we know (or what we think we know) of Singapore’s founding history, and to consider how stories in history are always purposefully framed with specific beginnings and ends. Who decides on where a story starts and ends? What more could we learn from other perspectives yet to be heard or explored? How do we begin to tell our own stories—of ourselves, of places, people, and things that surround us; and what would their endings be?

Media:

i Light

Straits Times

Michael Lee and Perception3,  Where do stories begin / Where do stories end  (detail), 2019, LED neon rope mounted on acrylic sheets installed on railings of Cavenagh Bridge, Singapore, part of “Bridges of Time”: i Light 2019 Bicentennial Edition. Photo by Supergrapher.

Michael Lee and Perception3, Where do stories begin / Where do stories end (detail), 2019, LED neon rope mounted on acrylic sheets installed on railings of Cavenagh Bridge, Singapore, part of “Bridges of Time”: i Light 2019 Bicentennial Edition. Photo by Supergrapher.

Michael Lee and Perception3,  Where do stories begin / Where do stories end , 2019, LED neon rope mounted on acrylic sheets installed on railings of Cavenagh Bridge, Singapore, part of “Bridges of Time”: i Light 2019 Bicentennial Edition. Photo by Supergrapher.

Michael Lee and Perception3, Where do stories begin / Where do stories end, 2019, LED neon rope mounted on acrylic sheets installed on railings of Cavenagh Bridge, Singapore, part of “Bridges of Time”: i Light 2019 Bicentennial Edition. Photo by Supergrapher.

Michael Lee and Perception3,  Where do stories begin / Where do stories end , 2019, LED neon rope mounted on acrylic sheets installed on railings of Cavenagh Bridge, Singapore, part of “Bridges of Time”: i Light 2019 Bicentennial Edition. Photo by Supergrapher.

Michael Lee and Perception3, Where do stories begin / Where do stories end, 2019, LED neon rope mounted on acrylic sheets installed on railings of Cavenagh Bridge, Singapore, part of “Bridges of Time”: i Light 2019 Bicentennial Edition. Photo by Supergrapher.

How are things, 2018 by Michael Lee

Michael Lee,  How are things , 2018, holographic stickers on risers on Woodlands Stadium grandstand, Singapore, part of the public art exhibition, “Placing Home: Woodlands”, curated by Wang Ruo Bing for Arts in Your Neighbourhood, 2018. Photo by Ken Cheong.

Michael Lee, How are things, 2018, holographic stickers on risers on Woodlands Stadium grandstand, Singapore, part of the public art exhibition, “Placing Home: Woodlands”, curated by Wang Ruo Bing for Arts in Your Neighbourhood, 2018. Photo by Ken Cheong.

Details:

How are things greets stadium users, HDB residents and MRT commuters with a casual question. Realised using holographic stickers, which are often used in security systems, this large-scale text installation poses further questions about what it means to communicate sensitively for mutual flourishing.

Press:

Straits Times

Michael Lee,  How are things  (detail), 2018, holographic stickers on risers on Woodlands Stadium grandstand, Singapore, part of the public art exhibition, “Placing Home: Woodlands”, curated by Wang Ruo Bing for Arts in Your Neighbourhood, 2018. Photo by Ken Cheong.

Michael Lee, How are things (detail), 2018, holographic stickers on risers on Woodlands Stadium grandstand, Singapore, part of the public art exhibition, “Placing Home: Woodlands”, curated by Wang Ruo Bing for Arts in Your Neighbourhood, 2018. Photo by Ken Cheong.

Michael Lee,  How are things  (detail), 2018, holographic stickers on risers on Woodlands Stadium grandstand, Singapore, part of the public art exhibition, “Placing Home: Woodlands”, curated by Wang Ruo Bing for Arts in Your Neighbourhood, 2018. Photo by Ken Cheong.

Michael Lee, How are things (detail), 2018, holographic stickers on risers on Woodlands Stadium grandstand, Singapore, part of the public art exhibition, “Placing Home: Woodlands”, curated by Wang Ruo Bing for Arts in Your Neighbourhood, 2018. Photo by Ken Cheong.

"Mapping Our Lives", 2018 by Michael Lee

Installation view: “Mapping Our Lives”, 2018, part of Silver Arts 2018, held at The Plaza, National Library Board Building, 2018.

Installation view: “Mapping Our Lives”, 2018, part of Silver Arts 2018, held at The Plaza, National Library Board Building, 2018.

Details:

18 autobiographical mind maps by 10 seniors, led by Michael Lee

Artist Michael Lee led a group of ten seniors to create personal maps and diagrams that were inspired by their milestones in life. The first 4 of 8 workshops – each lasting 3 hours – were spent on mindmapping exercises of self-investigation. In Week 5, participants visited the National Gallery Singapore and National Museum of Singapore to see actual works of art. Weeks 6 and 7 were consultations between Lee and each senior to refine their final projects, which were presented in Week 8’s Show-and-Tell.

Related:

Catalogue

Creatif Compleks, 2018 by Michael Lee

Michael Lee,  Creatif Compleks,  project in The Vitrine, NTU CCA Singapore, 17 March – 9 September 2018, installation view. Courtesy NTU CCA Singapore. 

Michael Lee, Creatif Compleks, project in The Vitrine, NTU CCA Singapore, 17 March – 9 September 2018, installation view. Courtesy NTU CCA Singapore. 

Details:

LED ropes and LED tubes, 195 x 315 x 55 cm (vitrine dimensions)

Developed during his residency at NTU CCA Singapore, Creatif Compleks (2018) is the culmination of Michael Lee’s reflection on the function of the artist’s studio within the arts ecology of a city. The work takes the form of a diagram about a hypothetical property development consisting of various configurations of the artist’s home/studio. The use of LED light strips, a popular fixture in advertising and interior design, alludes to latent apprehensions about the development and promotion of the arts in Singapore which today are, arguably, at a feverish pitch. Informed by myths and fantasies of artists in their studios, the work takes a speculative leap into the utopian and the absurd.

A Chat with Lee Sze-Chin, 2017 by Michael Lee

Lee Sze-Chin in the kitchen area of his HDB flat at Sengkang, which he was renovating into a home-cum-community-arts-space. Photo by Michael Lee, 2017.

Lee Sze-Chin in the kitchen area of his HDB flat at Sengkang, which he was renovating into a home-cum-community-arts-space. Photo by Michael Lee, 2017.

A Chat with Lee Sze-Chin
Sengkang, Singapore
Recorded January 12, 2017; Posted May 1, 2018

In this chat in his HDB flat, where renovation was in progress, at Sengkang, Singapore, the artist, art therapist and art educator Lee Sze-Chin shares with Michael Lee about what he saw as his "sheltered" childhood experiences; multiple formal trainings in art, nursing and art therapy; and his plan to renovate his HDB flat into a home and community arts space.

Listen on Soundcloud

More on the upcoming workshop under Silver Arts 2018: artsforall.sg/initiatives/silver…magic-markers.aspx

More on the interviewee: szechinlee.wixsite.com/portfolio

© 2017 Lee Sze-Chin and Michael Lee

All rights reserved.

"Making liminal matter", 2017 by Michael Lee

Michael Lee, "Making liminal matter" (detail), 2017

Michael Lee, "Making liminal matter" (detail), 2017

Detail:

Essay / Text Contribution

Part of catalogue of Luke Heng's solo exhibition "After Asphodel", as documented in the catalogue (Singapore: Pearl Lam Galleries, 2017), n. p.

 

Read:

PDF

"Home for the Damned", 2008 by Michael Lee

Michael Lee, "Homes for the Damned" (detail), 2008

Michael Lee, "Homes for the Damned" (detail), 2008

Details:

Essay / Artist's Statement

Part of the catalogue of the art project, "The Consolations of Museology", as documented in Lilian Chee (Ed.), Foundations: The Consolations of Museology (Singapore: Studio Bibliotheque, 2008), pp. 1-8.

 

Read:

PDF

"Making New, Again", 2015 by Michael Lee

Michael Lee, "Making New, Again", 2015

Michael Lee, "Making New, Again", 2015

Details:

Essay

Part of catalogue of exhibition, Singapore as Unhomed: The Measure of Your Dwelling (Berlin: Institut fur Auslandsbeziehungen, 2015), pp. 135-37, curated by Jason Wee.

 

Read:

PDF

Office Orchitect, 2011 by Michael Lee

Michael Lee,  Office Orchitect  (installation view), 2011, retrospective exhibition for fictional architect K. S. Wong with 12 paper models with accompanying captions, mind map and introductory text, heights variable with 79 x 49 cm footprint, part of “Open House”: Singapore Biennale 2011 at Old Kallang Airport, Singapore. Photo by Tan Hai Han.

Michael Lee, Office Orchitect (installation view), 2011, retrospective exhibition for fictional architect K. S. Wong with 12 paper models with accompanying captions, mind map and introductory text, heights variable with 79 x 49 cm footprint, part of “Open House”: Singapore Biennale 2011 at Old Kallang Airport, Singapore. Photo by Tan Hai Han.

Michael Lee,  God’s Villa , from the installation  Office Orchitect , 2011, paper board, 22 x 79 x 49 cm. Photo by Tan Hai Han. Collection of Yeap Lam Yang.

Michael Lee, God’s Villa, from the installation Office Orchitect, 2011, paper board, 22 x 79 x 49 cm. Photo by Tan Hai Han. Collection of Yeap Lam Yang.

Michael Lee,  Syonan Fukusou Koujou , from the installation  Office Orchitect , 2011, paper board, 20 x 79 x 49 cm. Photo by Tan Hai Han. Collection of the artist.

Michael Lee, Syonan Fukusou Koujou, from the installation Office Orchitect, 2011, paper board, 20 x 79 x 49 cm. Photo by Tan Hai Han. Collection of the artist.

Michael Lee,  Columbarium Eye , from the installation  Office Orchitect , 2011, paper board, 74 x 79 x 49 cm. Photo by Tan Hai Han. Private collection.

Michael Lee, Columbarium Eye, from the installation Office Orchitect, 2011, paper board, 74 x 79 x 49 cm. Photo by Tan Hai Han. Private collection.

"what it is about when it is about nothing", 2015 by Michael Lee

Installation view of "what it is about when it is about nothing", 2015, at Mizuma Gallery, Singapore, photo by Tan Hai Han.

Installation view of "what it is about when it is about nothing", 2015, at Mizuma Gallery, Singapore, photo by Tan Hai Han.

Details:

7 artists

Mizuma Gallery, Singapore

25 Sep - 25 Oct 2015

Michael Lee invites 7 sets of artists (Adeline Kueh, Ho Rui An, Homa Shajoie, Jennis Li Cheng Tien, Michael Lee, Perception3 and Robert Zhao) to exhibit works that relate with the nation-state of Singapore obliquely and reflectively.

 

Related: 

Catalogue

 

Texts:

randian

TODAY,

Lianhe Zaobao

Diagonals, 2014 by Michael Lee

Installation view at "Machine for (Living) Dying In", Yavuz Fine Art, Singapore: Michael Lee,  Slab ;  Diagonals,  2014, photo by Ken Cheong.

Installation view at "Machine for (Living) Dying In", Yavuz Fine Art, Singapore: Michael Lee, Slab; Diagonals, 2014, photo by Ken Cheong.

Installation view at "Machine for (Living) Dying In", Yavuz Fine Art, Singapore: Michael Lee,  Slab ;  Diagonals ;  Hazard No. 1 ;  Script for an Unperformed Performance No. 1 , all 2014, photo by Ken Cheong.

Installation view at "Machine for (Living) Dying In", Yavuz Fine Art, Singapore: Michael Lee, Slab; Diagonals; Hazard No. 1; Script for an Unperformed Performance No. 1, all 2014, photo by Ken Cheong.

Details:

Emulsion on wall, polyurethane on PVC, enamel on galvanized iron, 294 x 650 cm. 

The artwork title describes the black-and-yellow stripes rendered on the wall and PVC curtains that together form a paradox: a hazard symbol that is visible only upon passing through.

 

Related:

Catalogue

 

Exhibitions: 

starprojects, Hong Kong

Publika, Kuala Lumpur

Yavuz Fine Art, Singapore

 

Press: 

Artinfo

Artling;

Arts Republik;

Gallery & Studio;

Singapore Architect; 

Straits Times

TODAY

Gone Solo, 2013 by Michael Lee

Michael Lee,  Gone Solo  (still), 2013, Digital video, mute and b&w, 14 min.

Michael Lee, Gone Solo (still), 2013, Digital video, mute and b&w, 14 min.

Details:

Gone Solo compiles 45 cases of solitary departure. It is a memorial and rehearsal for the inevitable.

Related:

Excerpt

Michael Lee,  Gone Solo  (gallery view), 2013, part of  Machine for (Living) Dying In,  2014, curated by Melanie Pocock at Yavuz Fine Arts, Singapore. Photo by Ken Cheong.

Michael Lee, Gone Solo (gallery view), 2013, part of Machine for (Living) Dying In, 2014, curated by Melanie Pocock at Yavuz Fine Arts, Singapore. Photo by Ken Cheong.